I’m too scared to think what I’ll do to you if you buy me a pair.

I’m too scared to think what I’ll do to you if you buy me a pair.

LEAVE A MESSAGE IN MY INBOX SAYING WHO YOU THINK I SHOULD COSPLAY

lithefider:

skittzipoo:

miss-kiyotaka:

Give me at least one character and the reason you chose them. It can be based on looks or personality.

image

CURIOUS

(via maketaori)

uhouse:

nobledrewali:

chipcococafe:

rectumofglory:

NOTHING IS BETTER THAN GOOD RICE LITERALLY NOTHING

NO RICE NO LIFE.

finally people understand me .

i need this right now

uhouse:

nobledrewali:

chipcococafe:

rectumofglory:

NOTHING IS BETTER THAN GOOD RICE LITERALLY NOTHING

NO RICE NO LIFE.

finally people understand me .

i need this right now

(via theblackestwidow)

nekokat42:

I do this several times a day

(via neobula)

cishet anon: i am a queersexual transgendered and im here to say you are very rude to straight people. they are amazing and only try to help you - erm, i mean us, us! hating on The Cisnormal and Heteronormal people is heterophobic and homosexist. i am a 100% legit gaysexual saying this so if you don't do as i say you're being a homophone
didanawisgi:

Egyptian blue - The oldest known artificial pigment


Egyptian Blue, also known as calcium copper silicate, is one of the first artificial pigments known to have been used by man. The oldest known example of the exquisite pigment is said to be about 5000 years old, found in a tomb painting dated to the reign of Ka-Sen, the last pharaoh of the First Dynasty. Others, however, state that the earliest evidence of the use of Egyptian blue is from the Fourth Dynasty and the Middle Kingdom, around 4,500 years ago. Nevertheless, by the New Kingdom, Egyptian Blue was used plentifully as a pigment in painting and can be found on statues, tomb paintings and sarcophagi. In addition, Egyptian blue was used to produce a ceramic glaze known as Egyptian faience.

Egyptian faience hippopotamus. Credit: British Museum
Its characteristic blue colour, resulting from one of its main components — copper — ranges from a light to a dark hue, depending on differential processing and composition. If the pigment is ground coarsely, it produces a rich, dark blue, while very finely-ground pigment produces a pale, ethereal blue.  It is made by heating a mixture of a calcium compound (typically calcium carbonate), a copper-containing compound (metal filings or malachite), silica sand and soda or potash as a flux, to around 850-950 C.
In Egyptian belief, blue was considered as the colour of the heavens, and hence the universe. It was also associated with water and the Nile. Thus, blue was the colour of life, fertility and rebirth. One of the naturally blue objects that the Egyptians had access to was lapis lazuli, a deep blue semi-precious stone  which could be ground up into powder, although this was a luxury item and had to be imported from Afghanistan. Therefore, it is not too surprising that the Egyptians sought to produce a synthetic pigment to use as a substitute for the blue lapis lazuli.    

Hunting in the marshes (fragment), tomb chapel of Nebamun. Credit: British Museum.
The manufacture of Egyptian Blue eventually spread beyond Egypt’s borders, and can be found throughout the Mediterranean. Egyptian Blue has been found in numerous Greek and Roman objects, including statues from the Parthenon in Athens and wall paintings in Pompeii. Despite its extensive application in art, Egyptian Blue ceased to be used, and its method of production was forgotten when the Roman era came to an end.
In the 19th century, Egyptian Blue was re-discovered. The excavations at Pompeii revealed that many wall paintings had Egyptian Blue on them, and this prompted scientists to investigate the exact composition of this pigment.  Since then, researchers have gained a much deeper understanding of its unique properties.  Experiments found that Egyptian Blue has the highly unusual quality of emitting infrared light when red light is shone onto it. This emission is extraordinarily powerful and long-lived, but cannot be seen by the naked eye, because human vision does not normally extend into the infrared range of the light spectrum. In addition, scientists unexpectedly discovered that Egyptian Blue will split into ‘nanosheets’ – a thousand times thinner than a human hair – if stirred in warm water for several days.  Scientists now believe that its unique properties may make Egyptian Blue suitable for a variety of modern applications.
Egyptian Blue may one day be utilized for communication purposes, as its beams are similar to those used in remote controls and telecommunication devices. Moreover, Egyptian blue could be used in advanced biomedical imaging, as its near-infrared radiation is able to penetrate through tissue better than other wavelengths. As an ink solution, Egyptian blue opens up new ways for its incorporation into modern appliances, such as the development of new types of security ink and possibly as a dye in the biomedical field.  While the use of Egyptian blue in modern high-tech applications is still in its infancy at this stage, it does seem that its future is a bright one.
Featured image: Left: Egyptian blue shown in an image of Ramses III 1170 BC. Image source. Right: Egyptian Blue pigment. Image source. 
http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-technology/egyptian-blue-oldest-artificial-pigment-ever-produced-001745#!brM20c




- See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-technology/egyptian-blue-oldest-artificial-pigment-ever-produced-001745#!brM20c

didanawisgi:

Egyptian blue - The oldest known artificial pigment

Egyptian Blue, also known as calcium copper silicate, is one of the first artificial pigments known to have been used by man. The oldest known example of the exquisite pigment is said to be about 5000 years old, found in a tomb painting dated to the reign of Ka-Sen, the last pharaoh of the First Dynasty. Others, however, state that the earliest evidence of the use of Egyptian blue is from the Fourth Dynasty and the Middle Kingdom, around 4,500 years ago. Nevertheless, by the New Kingdom, Egyptian Blue was used plentifully as a pigment in painting and can be found on statues, tomb paintings and sarcophagi. In addition, Egyptian blue was used to produce a ceramic glaze known as Egyptian faience.

Blue Egyptian faience hippopotamus

Egyptian faience hippopotamus. Credit: British Museum

Its characteristic blue colour, resulting from one of its main components — copper — ranges from a light to a dark hue, depending on differential processing and composition. If the pigment is ground coarsely, it produces a rich, dark blue, while very finely-ground pigment produces a pale, ethereal blue.  It is made by heating a mixture of a calcium compound (typically calcium carbonate), a copper-containing compound (metal filings or malachite), silica sand and soda or potash as a flux, to around 850-950 C.

In Egyptian belief, blue was considered as the colour of the heavens, and hence the universe. It was also associated with water and the Nile. Thus, blue was the colour of life, fertility and rebirth. One of the naturally blue objects that the Egyptians had access to was lapis lazuli, a deep blue semi-precious stone  which could be ground up into powder, although this was a luxury item and had to be imported from Afghanistan. Therefore, it is not too surprising that the Egyptians sought to produce a synthetic pigment to use as a substitute for the blue lapis lazuli.    

Hunting in the marshes (fragment), tomb chapel of Nebamun

Hunting in the marshes (fragment), tomb chapel of Nebamun. Credit: British Museum.

The manufacture of Egyptian Blue eventually spread beyond Egypt’s borders, and can be found throughout the Mediterranean. Egyptian Blue has been found in numerous Greek and Roman objects, including statues from the Parthenon in Athens and wall paintings in Pompeii. Despite its extensive application in art, Egyptian Blue ceased to be used, and its method of production was forgotten when the Roman era came to an end.

In the 19th century, Egyptian Blue was re-discovered. The excavations at Pompeii revealed that many wall paintings had Egyptian Blue on them, and this prompted scientists to investigate the exact composition of this pigment.  Since then, researchers have gained a much deeper understanding of its unique properties.  Experiments found that Egyptian Blue has the highly unusual quality of emitting infrared light when red light is shone onto it. This emission is extraordinarily powerful and long-lived, but cannot be seen by the naked eye, because human vision does not normally extend into the infrared range of the light spectrum. In addition, scientists unexpectedly discovered that Egyptian Blue will split into ‘nanosheets’ – a thousand times thinner than a human hair – if stirred in warm water for several days.  Scientists now believe that its unique properties may make Egyptian Blue suitable for a variety of modern applications.

Egyptian Blue may one day be utilized for communication purposes, as its beams are similar to those used in remote controls and telecommunication devices. Moreover, Egyptian blue could be used in advanced biomedical imaging, as its near-infrared radiation is able to penetrate through tissue better than other wavelengths. As an ink solution, Egyptian blue opens up new ways for its incorporation into modern appliances, such as the development of new types of security ink and possibly as a dye in the biomedical field.  While the use of Egyptian blue in modern high-tech applications is still in its infancy at this stage, it does seem that its future is a bright one.

Featured image: Left: Egyptian blue shown in an image of Ramses III 1170 BC. Image source. Right: Egyptian Blue pigment. Image source

http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-technology/egyptian-blue-oldest-artificial-pigment-ever-produced-001745#!brM20c

- See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-technology/egyptian-blue-oldest-artificial-pigment-ever-produced-001745#!brM20c

(via faiirysex)

titovka-and-bergmutzen:

Cutaways of the MiG-29 and the MiG-21 Russian fighter aircraft.

jump-gate:

Macross Zero

jump-gate:

Macross Zero

wiredimage:

"Two Mig-29 [on the background] intercepted by F-15 Eagles [the two trails flying away and crossing] of the 21st Composite Fighter Wing. The 43rd and 54th Tactical Fighter Squadrons, part of the 21st CFW, patrolled 580,000 square miles from the North Pole to the tip of the Aleutian Islands."
(via Gizmodo.co.uk)

wiredimage:

"Two Mig-29 [on the background] intercepted by F-15 Eagles [the two trails flying away and crossing] of the 21st Composite Fighter Wing. The 43rd and 54th Tactical Fighter Squadrons, part of the 21st CFW, patrolled 580,000 square miles from the North Pole to the tip of the Aleutian Islands."

(via Gizmodo.co.uk)

(Source: images.military.com)